The African Children's Stories Program

Project Representative
Di Fleming, Executive Director
Creation Date: 2012
Headquarters: Melbourne, Australia
Geographical Reach: 24 African countries
Nature and number of beneficiaries: Reach across 24 African Countries, 53 Collections of African Children's Stories published, over 700 African student authors published with over 500,000 books distributed.
Contact

The African Children's Stories Program

About the Project

 

African Children’s Stories (ACS) uses reading and writing of stories to promote literacy in Africa. ACS is an inclusive initiative that has engaged over 37,000 children from 619 primary schools in 21 African nations in which they write stories that are later published and freely distributed back into the community by the Ducere Foundation.

The ACS has a key element of cultural preservation, encouraging children to tell their own stories that are both relevant to and engage with their local cultures, along with enhancing literacy skills, providing hope for the future. The books are distributed across schools, and accessible to the greater community. This model has proven to be a success, as the children tend to understand and connect better with reading materials that they can relate to, hence simplifying the learning process. As a result, the ACS model has been able to replicate and expand into 21 African nations, creating over 50 collections, and printing over 300,000 books.

Context and Issue

Approximately 59 million African children are out-of-school, of which more than half live in sub-Saharan Africa. Without urgent action, the situation will deteriorate as the gap between education standards in Africa and the rest of the world widens. African Children’s Stories (ACS) was established to produce culturally relevant teaching and learning resources aimed at providing a solution and enhancing literacy levels.

Solution and Impact

ACS was established to produce reading material that culturally relates to an African context, rather than westernised stories with no significance to African children. Localised content benefits children as a learning tool through stories relating to their own surroundings and cultural context. This simplifies the learning process and enables them to better understand the materials when compared to non-African narratives.

We resource and empower teachers to inspire their students to write about their lives and culture, along with encouraging the children to sit with their elders and listen to stories of the past.

The process facilitates the preservation of stories, culture, and oral tradition of their communities which were rapidly being diminished by Western civilisation. We directly impact students to become storytellers and build close relationships with their communities. The stories then become fundamental supplementary reading material shared by schools across many nations.

Future Developments

The program has seen rapid development, replication, and delivery from 1 country in 2012, to 24 African nations in 2018. The growth has seen 619 school partnerships, 435 teachers assisted, and over 37,000 children engaged with. The significant impact of the program has prompted the creation of 28 major partnerships and significant contributions and assistance from Australian High Commissions in Africa, and African governments. The future development goal is to capture, publish and distribute African children's stories from the 54 African nations by 2024, with over 2,000,000 books printed and distributed to schools.

Join the Discussion

0 comments

Join the Discussion

0 comments